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  You are in: Home > History > The Experience of Being Poor in England, 1700–1834  
 

The Experience of Being Poor in England, 1700–1834
The Interaction of Community Sentiment, Kinship and Demography

Steven King

Steven King is Professor of Economic History at the University of Leicester. He publishes widely on the history of British and European welfare, 1700–1920. He is the author (jointly with Dr A. Tomkins) of The Poor in England 1700–1850: An Economy of Make-shifts (“a significant contribution to our understanding of the highly complex economy of makeshifts”, is Professor of Economic History at the University of Leicester. He publishes widely on the history of British and European welfare, 1700–1920. He is the author (jointly with Dr A. Tomkins) of The Poor in England 1700–1850: An Economy of Make-shifts (“a significant contribution to our understanding of the highly complex economy of makeshifts”, Economic History Review.

 

At the core of this book are the stories and life-cycles of the poor themselves. Drawing on sources (pauper letters, petitions, vestry minutes, newspaper reporting and accounts) collected over the last twenty years, Steven King poses three key questions: How did the dependent poor experience and talk about such variables as housing, family, medical care, or the makeshift economy? How were such experiences related to situational matters such as ethnicity, belonging, kinship, family size and structure, and the relative wealth or poverty of the communities in which they found themselves? And to what extent did the poor themselves have agency in the poor law systems with which they engaged?

While practice and experience varied markedly within and between areas and between rural and urban contexts, the author suggests that paupers under the mature Old Poor Law had gained considerable agency in their dealings with officials. They learnt to navigate rules and systems of entitlement, became expert at rhetoricising their stories and problems, and adopted the same linguistic platform as the overseers with whom they engaged. Such strategies, it is argued, means that it is necessary to look beyond the scandals, penny-pinching and negative sentiments of particularly well-documented parishes and adopt a much more complex view of the intent, sentiment and outcomes of the Old Poor Law.


List of Contents to follow
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Publication Details

 
Hardback ISBN:
978-1-84519-433-8
 
 
Page Extent / Format:
320 pp. / 229 x 152 mm
 
Release Date:
March 2014
  Illustrated:   Yes
 
Hardback Price:
£60.00 / $84.95
 
 

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